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West Cork

Coast Guard Station

Price starts from €9,000 per week

For the voyage is done and the winds don’t blow

Irish Sea Shanty

Welcome to Coast Guard Station, a stone-built haven for mariners and history enthusiasts alike; a discreet hide-away perched right at the water’s edge with breathtaking views of the bay of Skibbereen, Castlehaven, and Horse Island, the site of numerous historic shipwrecks.

This unique holiday home, is steeped in rich heritage dating back to the 1800s. Once a bustling coastguard station, the property now offers an exclusive self-catering retreat for up to 12 guests – perfect for large families seeking a luxurious escape.

For water enthusiasts, the home provides a running mooring and deep-water mooring, ideal for those bringing their own boat. Guests can also enjoy kayaking, paddleboarding, and dinghy adventures with equipment readily available. As night falls, the provided telescope offers a perfect way to stargaze and unwind under the vast, starry sky.

Experience the perfect blend of history, luxury, and adventure at Coast Guard Station, where every moment promises a touch of magic and discovery.

Book This Home

At a Glance

Bedrooms

Sleep up to 12 guests
Four double bedrooms
Three twin bedrooms

Bathrooms

Six bathrooms

Other Rooms

Open plan Kitchen – Dining room
Sitting room
TV room
Garden room
Reception hall
Weights room
Cloak room with WC

Features & Tech

Aga cooking range
Open fireplaces
Outdoor seating and dining areas
Flat screen smart TV
good WiFi internet

Availability

Weekly only: Saturday to Saturday

EV Charging

This home has no electric charging point. Click here for more information on EV charging and locations.

Restrictions

NO PETS
No smoking
Parties – The owners regret Stag, Hen, or 21st parties are not admissible.
Children – As with all traditional country properties we would urge caution with young children in an unfamiliar environment.

Property Features

An exceptional location

From its sweeping double-height entrance hall and limed oak stairway to its eclectic furniture, this is a house full of drama and storytelling. A linear home, just one room deep, it is an amalgam of six two-storey coastguard cottages, with large windows facing southwards to catch the everchanging views, and more traditional small cottage windows to the northern side.

There are spacious reception rooms comprising a sitting room through double doors off the main entrance with TV, and a second comfortable family lounge with a fireplace down the hall.

The kitchen is generous and bright with an Island unit, polished Spanish granite work surfaces, and traditional linoleum flooring – something of a rarity these days. To one end, a conservatory bay extension is home to the dining area, with a door to the garden.
There is a rear hall and pantry off the kitchen.

Much of the interior has a distinct maritime feel with blue and white palettes, rattan flooring and driftwood lamps.

Bedrooms

Sleep up to 14 guests.

There is one double bedroom on the ground floor, with four poster, ensuite shower and direct access to the garden.

Most of the bedrooms feature vaulted ceilings with antique exposed beams, and all of them together with nearly every other room, has a sea view. You can survey the maritime traffic into and out of the harbour, from trawlers and ocean-crossing yachts to bay-hopping kayaks.

The master bedroom has a separate secondary staircase from the rear Hall beyond the kitchen.

Outside

Double timber gates give access to cobble lock forecourt with ample parking.

There is an expansive lawned garden with multiple outdoor seating and dining choices sheltered from prevailing westerly winds by high stone walls and plantings and linked by meandering stone pathways.

For water enthusiasts, the home provides a running mooring and deep-water mooring, ideal for those bringing their own boat. Guests can also enjoy kayaking, paddleboarding, and dinghy adventures with equipment readily available. If you’re a scuba diving enthusiast, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better destination.

Adding to the appeal to lovers of the sea is a traditional Admiralty flagpole. The grounds include a stone marking, dating from 1811, denoting ‘Ordnance Survey levelling Mark No 1,’ a historical benchmark point of reference for measuring sea levels.

It’s just a short walk to Castletownshend village.

Facilities

Kitchen & Utility Appliances

• Aga range with 4 ovens and 3 plates
• Fridge & freezer
• Dishwasher
• Microwave
• Toaster
• Nespresso coffee machine
• Washing machine & spin-dryer
• Iron

Bedrooms

• Sizes – Four double beds and six single beds beds
• 3 Hairdryers

Tech & Entertainment

• Wi-Fi Internet
• Flat-screen TV

Other

• Central heating
• Weights room
• Good selection of games & books
• Telescope
• BBQ
• 2 Kayaks & paddleboards
• Walking distance to village

Out and About

This corner of Ireland has a wonderful food culture, with award-winning artisan producers, leading chefs, traditional pubs and long-established food festivals. You’ll not regret coming to West Cork.

Things to do

Annual festivals a-plenty include
Traditional Irish music Festival,
Fastnet Maritime and Folk Festival,
Skibbereen Food Festival,
Cape Clear Storytelling,
and many sailing events including Calves Week

The Locality

The silent h in the middle of Castletownshend was added in 1870.

The deep sheltered water of Castlehaven Bay was the scene of the sinking of a small Spanish Armada in 1602 that subsequently led to a game-changing event in Irish history known as the Flight of the Earls.

Edith Sommerville (1858-1949) spent most of her life in Drishane House at the top of the village. Memorable for her writings in collaboration with her cousin under the pseudonym “Somerville and Ross”- of which The Experiences of an Irish R.M is probably the best known – she was also a highly regarded painter, with many examples of her work in the house.

There are three stained glass windows by the renowned Art Nouveau illustrator Harry Clarke in St.Barrahane’s Castletownshend church which you may find interesting. He was a particularly enchanted with achieving blues.


Click here for more

Just ten kilometres away to the North is the thriving market town of Skibbereen. Every Saturday there is a lively farmers market here with excellent artisan food and crafts.
There is a sheltered beach at Castlehaven – five minutes away – which is ideal for launching kayaks, but for a more sandy and south facing beach, Tragumna blue flag beach is about 15 minutes away, and an easy cycle.

Baltimore is perhaps Ireland’s most southern town. A 30 minute drive away, it is the terminal for ferries to Clear and Sherkin Islands. The town has a long tradition of wooden boat building.
Between 1880 and 1926 Baltimore was the largest fishing port in the country and 78 fishing vessels were registered locally.
By 1907, the fleet was so numerous that you could, it was said, walk to Sherkin across the decks of the boats! At one stage there were seven trains every day out of Baltimore, all carrying fish for the American market.

Lough Hyne, now a Marine Nature Reserve, is about 25 minutes from the house. Enclosed yet tidal, the lake is renowned for its unique marine life. Sea kayaking is also available here, and there is a lovely walk to the summit above.

30 mins away, Drombeg stone circle or The Druid’s Altar, is one of the most visited megalithic sites in Ireland – go early to avoid crowds.

The Fastnet rock lies 19km to the south of Baltimore. Its lighthouse flashes once every five seconds, and has a range of 27 nautical miles. In 1985, the lighthouse was struck by a rogue wave measuring about 157 feet (48 m) in height.

How to get there

Car advised…

By Air: Cheap flights to Kerry Airport (Farrenfore) Cork, Dublin or Shannon.
Kerry Airport – approx 2 hours from the house.
Cork Airport – approx 1.5 hours from the house.
Shannon Airport – approx 3.5 hours from the house.
Dublin Airport – approx 4.5 hours from the house.

By Sea: Ferry crossings from Pembroke/Fishguard to Rosslare.
Stena Express – 120 mins (summer only from Fishguard)
Rosslare Port is approx 4 hours from the house
Dublin City Port/Holyhead has a fast crossing and is approx 4 hours from the house

Pricing Options

Pricing starts from €9,000 per week – please enquire bookings@uniqueirishhomes.ieImportant – this home ONLY rents by the week/7 nights.

A week’s booking runs from Saturday to Saturday

A refundable breakages deposit of €1,000 is payable with the rental amount will be refunded within seven days of departure.

Book This Home

Step 1: Select your date.

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • Please note all booking requests are subject to 24 hour approval.
  • Once your provisional booking has been placed, the UIH team will verify it, answer any specific queries you may have, and request a deposit to lock in your dates.
  • Please note if your provisional booking is not confirmed and the deposit paid within 3 days it will expire.
  • If your preferred dates are not available, click here to review alternate options.
  • For additional information please contact us on +353 85 860 0027