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Remote simplicity to inspire the soul

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Duibh Oilean House, County Mayo

Big skies, narrow roads and celtic mists are the setting for this peaceful cottage where time has a different meaning and nature calls the shots.
The Mullet peninsula is one of those unspoiled and under-explored gems of Ireland where the wind blows out the cobwebs, the tides set your clock, and the scale of the landscape is humbling. How can you resist?

kitchen

Blow the cobwebs out

This solidly built family cottage was designed as a retreat - a comfortable space to reflect and renew, and to engage with nature.
The result is inspiring, cosy, simply furnished and unpretentious.

open plan coffee corner

The central living spaces of the cottage are largely open plan, and overlap.
The main dining area enjoys exceptional 180 degree views across the bay to Nephin Mountains, and South to Achill. It is also the wicker-chair sun-room, looking out onto an expansive pasture, above a tidal wetland. The other end of the sun-room opens into a spacious modern kitchen.

wine rack lobster living room

Beside the large double-door stove bounteous baskets of dried turf wait patiently for their turn to radiate a comforting glow.

Here you can recline on symmetrical couches settled against the windows, and rejoice in the spectacle of sea birds wheeling in the breeze outside, or simply nod off with a novel – there are plenty to choose from.

Rates & Dates

The house takes advantage of spectacular views across Blacksod Bay to the mountains of Mayo, and South towards Achill Island’s Slievemore.

view out evening

The living area links through an archway southward from the kitchen.

sitting room
living room couches

The cottage inspires creativity and is much loved by writers and artists. A small study with its own pot-bellied stove is a cosy, private place to hole up, write and think.

the study

A carpeted, open games area at the top of the stairs introduces two more bedrooms and a bathroom.
The TV and DVD are here- but it also works well on rainy days for Twister or Yoga.

games area

Outside

The house faces across Blacksod Bay with access to a private beach at the tip of the wetland below.
The Blue flag beach at Mullaghroe is an easy walk from the house.

the house

This is a rural landscape - big seas, bigger skies, weather, wind and hardy donkeys.
There are few trees but we excel in dry stone walls and bog-land.

hare cows

The principle double bedroom on the ground floor has an ensuite bathroom, and the twin beside it has a walk-in shower.

master bedroom bedrooms

Facilities

This home has everything you will need on a family holiday- from WiFi to clothes dryer to microwave, books, games, TV and videos .
If you have a particular requirement, be sure to tell us..

FAQs

Restrictions

Smoking - No, sorry!
Parties - The owners regret Stag, Hen, Wedding or 21st parties are not admissible.
Pets – small, non-shedding dogs only

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outside

Out and About

The Mullet peninsula really is a gem of unspoiled nature, with extraordinary beaches, wonderful walks, and some of the nicest people you could meet.
With so much to enjoy, we just can’t list them all, so here are a few of our favourites..
Oh, and always bring a coat!

the beach
Here are links to some of our favourite activities-

Reviews

New to Unique Irish Homes - 2014

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Check out the Irish Times prize for The Best Place to go Wild in Ireland and this article on Belmullet
flowers

About the Locality

There are a sprinkling of other mostly farm dwellings around Devilane House.
The peninsula is a designated Gaeltacht area where many families still use Irish as their first language.

The village of Aughleam is about 30 minutes away on foot. It has a small shop, a garage, a pub, Post office and a Heritage Center.
Una’s Pub, just down the road towards the point is the best place locally for Craic agus Ceol.

fields

You will have passed through the main regional town of Belmullet which straddles the isthmus link to the mainland 17km to the north. Apart from restaurants and supermarkets, the town hosts a farmers market in the square on Saturday mornings.

Wild Atlantic Way

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The Mullet Peninsula protects the west coast of Mayo from the full force of the ocean, and consists mainly of sand dunes and fine white beaches. The windswept Atlantic side is heaven for surfers, while the sheltered east-facing coves are perfect for family pottering .
This is one of the most remote areas of Ireland and is characterised by changeable weather, broad stretches of wet carpet bog, and unspoilt natural amenities.

Erris Head

To the northern end of the spit the Erris Head loop walk is just one of several. This is special place to view migrating birds from the cliffs, which can only be reached on foot.

fishing rod mackerel

In common with many of the Wild Atlantic Way localities, sea angling out of Blacksod Bay is superlative. Take a boat trip or try your hand off the rocks.

St Deirbhile's Well lies a short distance from the house. The water from this blessed well is alleged to have curative properties for eye complaints. A pilgrimage takes place annually to the well on August 15th in honour of the saint.

The Islands

Off the coast to the west lie the exposed Inishkea Islands which are worth a visit. The inhabitants abandoned the settlement in the 1930s after most of their young men died at sea in a storm.

abandoned village

A semi ruined village remains, where white sand blown in from the beach covers most of the floors several feet deep.
There are also numerous archaeological sites, both Neolithic and monastic.
Important internationally as a bird sanctuary, half of the Irish wintering population of Barnacle geese make the islands their home.

geese flying

The largest breeding colonies of Atlantic Grey seals in Ireland are to be found inhabiting the coves and beaches across these islands.


Glosh Tower

Glosh Tower commands a fine view from the top of Termon Hill. It is one of the 82 Napoleonic signal Towers built around the coast at the start of the 19th century to keep watch for signs of a French invasion.

In June 1944, as he watched the barometer fall precipitously, Ted Sweeney's report from the Coast Guard station in Blacksod Bay convinced General Dwight D Eisenhower to delay the Allied D-Day invasion for 24 hours – a decision which averted a military catastrophe and changed the course of the Second World War.


How to get there - Car advised..

By Air: Flights to Ireland West Airport (Knock) from the UK
Knock Airport - approx 1.5 hours from house.
Shannon Airport - approx 3.5 hours from house.
Dublin Airport - approx 4.5 hours from house.

By Sea: Ferry crossings from Pembroke/Fishguard to Rosslare.
Stena Express - 120 mins (summer only from Fishguard)
Swansea/Cork Ferry is 1.5 hours from the house.
Rosslare Port is approx 5.5 hours from house.
Dublin City Port/Holyhead has a fast crossing and is approx 4.5 hours from house.

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Photo Gallery

Gallery of photographs